Handbook for the Community Engagement Professional Credentialing Program

Updated March 2020

How to Use this Handbook

This handbook contains information on how you can participate in the Community Engagement Professional (CEP) Credentialing Program by applying to earn individual micro-credentials in core competency areas. It also explains the process through which you can combine earned micro-credentials to achieve full status as a Campus Compact-certified community engagement professional.

Campus Compact encourages all applicants to read this entire handbook. The purpose of the handbook is to provide important information about the policies and procedures for earning certification.

CEP Credentialing Program Contact Information

For more information about Campus Compact, contact the national office. Find this information at https://compact.org/who-we-are/.

For general information about the credentialing program, visit the Campus Compact Community Engagement Professional Credentialing Program website at: https://credential.compact.org/.

To apply for currently available micro-credentials, go to: https://compact.smapply.io/ 

To contact the credential program administration, please email: credential@compact.org. 

Index

Program Essentials

  1. What is a Micro-credential?
  2. Full list of micro-credentials
  3. What is “competency?”
  4. How does one demonstrate competency to earn a Micro-credential?
  5. How much does it cost to earn a Micro-credential?
  6. How does one earn full certification as a Campus Compact CEP?

Support and Preparation Opportunities for Applicants

  1. Micro-Credential Knowledge Hubs
  2. Communities of Practice (CoPs)
  3. Approved Training Opportunities
  4. What Distinguishes a CoP from an Approved Training Opportunity

The Application Process

  1. Enrollment Periods
  2. Start your application online
  3. Agreement Form and Fee
  4. Submitting Materials
  5. Evaluation of Applications
  6. Communicating the Decision
  7. Seeking Full Certification as a Campus Compact CEP

Appendices  

  1. Reviewer Confidentiality and Conflict of Interest Agreement
  2. Policy for Presumptive or Discretionary Denial or Revoking of Certification
  3. Request for Permission to Use Application Responses for Research Purposes

Purpose of the Credentialing Program

The CEP Credentialing Program has two (2) core purposes:

  1. To provide civic and community engagement professionals with opportunities to gain recognition for knowledge and skills they have developed throughout their careers.
  2. To promote and encourage ongoing professional development among participants that foster reflective, inclusive, and equity-focused partnerships and commitments.

Professionals may earn micro-credentials in up to 15 core competency areas that are key to success in higher education civic and community engagement. Each earned individual micro-credential, or digital badge, recognizes an individual’s threshold of knowledge, skills, experience, and critical commitments in each core competency area. CEPs may combine earned micro-credentials across a range of competency areas to apply for recognition as a fully-certified Community Engagement Professional.

The credentialing process is managed by Campus Compact, a membership-based, 401(3)c organization that serves as a national coalition of 1,000+ colleges and universities committed to the public purposes of higher education. The administration and supervision of the program is overseen by Campus Compact’s Director of Professional Learning, supported by the contributions of two separate Advisory Boards, one supporting content development (Content Advisory Board) and the other supporting operations, policy, and procedure (Operations Advisory Board).

Campus Compact understands the importance of impartiality and fairness in carrying out its certification activities and strives to be fair, impartial, and open in all of its operations. It seeks to achieve these goals through sound organizational structures, strong management, proper oversight, detailed policies and procedures, consistent application of rules, excellent communication, strong security, and proper use of confidentiality and conflict of interest agreements. The Compact is committed to consistently performing all of the requirements outlined in this Handbook to ensure the program’s continued fairness, reliability, impartiality, relevance, and reputation. This includes ongoing efforts to ensure its certification activities are transparent and non-discriminatory, and that equitable measures are used in the assessment of applicants, candidates, and certified persons.

As the certification body, Campus Compact shall be responsible for, shall retain authority for, and shall not delegate its decisions related to certification, including the granting, maintaining, recertifying, expanding and reducing the scope of the certification, and suspending or withdrawing certification.

Organizational Structure

The following entities make up the development and administrative team of the CEP Credentialing Program:

Campus Compact

Certifying Entity that owns and administers credentialing program under the direct supervision of the Director of Professional Learning*

  • Responsible for developing and maintaining certification program
  • Serves as 3rd party credentialer
  • Director of Professional Learning
    • Serves as central administrator of the program; convenes and oversees the activities of advisory boards and peer reviewers
    • Trains peer reviewers to effectively utilize rubrics and assessment tools
    • Provides ultimate oversight of application decisions (approval, rejection, revision and resubmission)

Content Advisory Board (Term: 2 year, renewable)

Made up of senior-level community engagement scholar-practitioners from across the US who:

  • Collaborate on the development of a system of micro-credentials, based on core competency areas, for community engagement professionals
  • Help develop, frame, revise, and ultimately approve the content of core competency areas for micro-credentials
  • Develop and approve assessment mechanisms and evaluation tools/rubrics related to micro-credentialing process
  • Collaborate on the development of metrics for evaluating the credentialing program’s impact and effectiveness
  • Serve as initial application reviewers for newly-released micro-credentials

Operations Advisory Board (Term: 2 year, renewable)

Made up of senior-level community engagement scholar-practitioners from across the US who:

  • Review and consult on credential system plan
  • Advise on and validate the credential structure on an on-going, systematic basis
  • Advise on ethical, financial and legal considerations to ensure that the credentialing program is in line with Campus Compact’s mission and values
  • Review and assess program’s policies and procedures to ensure fairness, impartiality, and inclusion
  • Review outcomes and metrics created by the Content Board for evaluating the credential’s impact, and regularly measuring its performance and effectiveness using those metrics

Peer reviewers (ongoing)

  • Community engagement practitioners chosen for their extensive expertise and competency in the micro-credential area for which they serve as reviewer
  • Reviewers’ competency is evidenced either by their earning of the micro-credential or through an assessment of their relevant experience in, and contribution to, the field of higher education civic and community engagement.
  • Responsible for reviewing and assessing micro-credential applications, using established evaluation tools and rubrics
  • Provide recommendations on decision to award
  • Provide peer feedback to applicants on various aspects of their applications and competency-in-development
  • Provide feedback to Campus Compact to improve and enhance evaluation tools and materials

Background of the Credentialing Program

In 2015, Campus Compact initiated an exploration of what it might mean to create a professional certification for higher education community and civic engagement practitioners in a manner that could advance practitioners’ preparation, improve civic experiences and partnerships, and yield better results for students, institutions, and communities. After a comprehensive, field-wide survey initiative, a broad-based demand for such a program was confirmed, as was a broad sense of confidence that Campus Compact could effectively and impartially lead such a program. In 2016, Campus Compact initiated a process designed to identify and define the shared knowledge and practices of community engagement professionals (CEPs) by reviewing existing empirical practice literature. Fifteen research fellows from across the country were selected to assist in a large review of literature across a range of practice areas, including an effort to preliminarily distill from the literature a set of knowledge, skills, abilities, and dispositions in each area. Once the reviews were concluded, distinct competencies within each functional area were identified and formatted into an initial competency ranking tool. This ranking tool was tested at four professional meetings, after which it was refined and tested further at a Campus Compact convening of engagement leaders, including representatives from a range of national institutions recognized for their commitments to community engagement. This lead to a “Preliminary Competency Model for Community Engagement Professionals” that was published in 2017 as a book entitled, The Community Engagement Professional in Higher Education: A Competency Model for an Emerging Field (edited by Lina Dostilio) This was followed by a companion partitioners’ Guidebook  (Distilio and Welch) in 2019.

The Preliminary Competency Model became the earliest basis for the development of the micro-credential areas for the CEP Credentialing Program. These core competencies areas continue to be developed and refined under the leadership of the program’s Content Advisory Board which is responsible for the ongoing vetting, approval, and re-evaluation of the competencies. In February 2019, Campus Compact piloted two initial micro-credentials: Community Engagement Fundamentals and Community Partnerships. Fifty eight (58) CEPs from across the country participated in the pilot program. Following a 90-day application submission and review process, a comprehensive evaluation of the pilot was undertaken. This included an evaluation of the user experience and was informed by Campus Compact’s essential commitment to refine the initial assessment tools and rubrics.  Iin March 2019, Campus Compact launched the CEP Credentialing Program, offering all qualified CEPs the opportunity to apply for the two micro-credentials that were piloted. Peer reviewers for the micro-credential application submissions were chosen from among those who had earned a micro-credential in the pilot. All peer reviewers were trained in the use of the evaluation tools and rubrics for the program. Between 2019 and 2021, Campus Compact will continue to release the remainder of the 15 micro-credentials it has developed.

The Meaning of “Certification” in the CEP Credentialing Program

The CEP Credentialing Program is a certification program, not a certificate program (see “Certificate vs. Certification” chart below for the distinction). Each micro-credential earned through the CEP Credentialing Program is a time-limited recognition verifying that an individual has met established proficiency of competency through an eligibility application and assessment in that competency area. In other words, earning a micro-credential validates the competencies that a professional already has developed in a certain area of community engagement by asking that they demonstrate those competencies in various ways, such as through written, oral, practical, or observational means.

While each earned micro-credential is a consider a certification, CEPs may combine the micro-credentials they earn to seek recognition as a fully-certified Campus Compact Community Engagement Professional.

CERTIFICATION V CERTIFICATE

Certification Certificate
Results from an assessment process Results from an educational process
Awarded by a third party Awarded by trainings and educational program
Indicates proficiency-demonstration of a threshold of required competency to practice Indicates completion of a course or activity(ies)
Standards set through a defensible, industry-wide process that results in an outline of required competencies Course content set up by faculty or committee, occasionally through a defensible analysis
Results in formal designation (digital badge for micro-credential or full-certification) Listed on resume as a “Certificate in X”
Has ongoing requirements; holder must demonstrate they continue to meet the requirements No ongoing requirements. Individuals may or may not demonstrate knowledge of course at the end of a set period of time
Certification is owned by the certification body and can be taken away Certificate owned by the certificate holder

 

PROGRAM ESSENTIALS

 What is a micro-credential?

A micro-credential is a digital certification that recognizes an individual’s knowledge, skills, experience, and critical commitments in a specific core competency area. Earning a micro-credential validates the competencies that professionals already have developed in certain areas of community engagement by requiring that they demonstrate those competencies in particular ways. The competencies for each micro-credential are grounded in sound and comprehensive research that illustrates how that competency supports positive professional impact.

 Full List of Micro-Credentials

The Community Engagement Professional Credentialing Program consists of 15 micro-credentials across a range of competency areas. The full set of micro-credentials will be released on a rolling basis through 2021. The full list of current micro-credentials are:

  1. Community Engagement Fundamentals: A general overview of community engagement work and introduction to key concepts
  2. Community Partnerships: A focus on how to create and maintain mutually beneficial and reciprocal partnerships
  3. Supporting Engaged Faculty Development: An emphasis on understanding the faculty experience, tenure & promotion, and strategies to support faculty in engaged teaching, service, and research
  4. Community-Engaged Learning & Teaching (Service-Learning): The ability to design and carry out curricular community-engaged learning experiences that are mutually beneficial to students and community
  5. Engaged Research: An emphasis on designing and executing ethical and collaborative engaged research
  6. Program Administration: A focus on managing the work needed to administer an effective community engagement program
  7. Assessment & Evaluation: An understanding of how to design effective assessment and evaluation for programs, partnerships, and student learning
  8. Institutionalizing Engagement: An emphasis on strategies to advocate for and garner support for civic and community engagement work on campus
  9. Equity & Inclusion: A focus on understanding strategies to promote equity and a commitment to foster social justice
  10. Global Engagement: A general overview of key issues associated with community work in global contexts
  11. Student Civic Development and Leadership: A knowledge of and focus on strategies to promote student civic learning and civic agency
  12. Place-based Strategies: A focus on the theories and processes for anchor institutions and the importance of place
  13. P-12 Engagement: An emphasis on key issues associated with partnerships between campuses and P12 organizations
  14. Dialogue and Deliberation: The ability to effectively facilitate dialogue and engagement with an understanding of change theories
  15. Community Development:  An emphasis on engagement strategies that emphasize community capacity building and support for the communities (including the most marginalized within them) to develop and sustain themselves as well as collectively define their own needs and solutions.
What is “competency?”

For the purpose of Community Engagement Professional Credentialing Program, Campus Compact defines “competency” as the knowledge, skills, and critical commitments that must be mobilized by community engagement professionals to advance higher education community and civic engagement in a manner characterized by equity and integrity. To earn a micro-credential, an individual must demonstrate a threshold of knowledge, skills, and commitments as it relates to a set of key competencies that were identified and developed through a comprehensive and inclusive identification process and which draw significantly from the research of Lina Dostilio and colleagues (2017; 2019) on an emerging competency model for community engagement professionals.

How does one demonstrate competency to earn a micro-credential?

To earn a micro-credential, applicants must demonstrate competency in a particular area of community and civic engagement by submitting a set of materials for evaluation. While specific submission requirements vary by micro-credential, materials typically require the applicant to provide evidence of their competency in the following areas:

Knowledge and ethics

  • What knowledge have you brought to bear in undertaking work in this area? What ethical and critical commitments inform your work?

Experience

  • What experience(s) have you had and what roles have you played in advancing work in this area? For example, how have you developed goals, organized projects, or carried out activities? What evidence can you provide to illustrate this work?

Critical self-reflection

  • What have you learned from your experiences in this area? What successes and challenges did you experience? What dilemmas or tensions may have arisen or could you identify (around questions of equity and inclusion, for example), and what process or strategies did you pursue to work toward their resolution?

Personal growth and on-going professional development

  • What might you identify as opportunities for personal growth as a community engagement professional in this particular area? What resources or strategies do you believe would serve to advance your learning and competence in this area?

A full and specific list of submission requirements for each micro-credential can be found on the specific micro-credential webpages.

How much does it cost to earn a micro-credential?

Each micro-credential application requires a $60 application fee. The fee helps to cover a small portion of the software and administrative costs Campus Compact is undertaking as a third party credentialer.

How can one earn the status of a fully-certified Campus Compact CEP?

To apply for full certification, a candidate must earn micro-credentials in the three (3) core competency areas (Community Engagement Fundamentals, Community Partnerships, and Equity & Inclusion) as well as earn three (3) additional micro-credentials in areas of their choice (i.e., three of among the remaining twelve [12] elective micro-credentials).

Once a candidate has fulfilled this requirement, they may submit a personal statement that will qualify them to be considered for full certification. Note: Micro-credential to be applied toward full certification must be earned or renewed within the previous three years period.

The Application Process

Applications for micro-credentials are submitted through Campus Compact’s online application portal (https://compact.smapply.io/) . The application portal can also be accessed by clicking the “begin your application” button on any of the individual micro-credential webpages. An applicant should begin the application when they intend to begin work toward the micro-credential. The application system will help you track your progress, understand requirements, and plan for submission.

  1. Enrollment period: There are three (3) enrollment periods available per calendar year: summer, fall, and winter/spring. Please see the credentialing website for specific enrollment period dates. Micro-credential applications can be initiated at any point during an enrollment period, but those initiated within a particular period should be finished and submitted within that same enrollment period. Should an applicant fail to submit all required materials within a single period, they forfeit their application fee. However, micro-credential application left unfinished within one enrollment period may, by advance request, be carried over and submitted in another but will be subject to an application renewal fee equal to the original.
  2. Start your application online. When you enter the application system, you will be asked to choose the specific micro-credential you wish to apply for (each micro-credential requires a unique application). You will then be asked to provide basic personal and demographic information as well as complete a brief self-assessment survey that will help you gauge how prepared you are for submission. The self-assessment survey asks you to reflect on your own knowledge, skills, and aptitudes related to the key competencies of the micro-credential area. The survey is designed to help applicants decide whether they are ready to continue through the micro-credential application process or whether they may want to first pursue additional training, professional development opportunities, or practical experiences. For those encouraged to seek further preparation, Campus Compact provides a vetted list of available training opportunities to support their learning and professional development. The Compact also provides a link to recommended readings and resources in the micro-credential area that candidates can explore and learn from. If, after completing the self-assessment, you feel prepared to begin, you may continue with the application.
  3. Agreement form and fee. Applicants are asked to complete an agreement form acknowledging that they intend to earn the micro-credential and understand the submission requirements. Following the agreement, applicants pay a small application fee ($60) to continue into the submission stage.
  4. Submission of required materials. Submission requirements vary by micro-credential; the requirement details for each micro-credential may be found on the specific application form. Typically, submission materials will include a CV or resume; a brief list of relevant professional development experiences, annotated artifact(s) demonstrating relevant aspects of one’s experience, a brief writing exercise reflecting on one’s experience and development of competency in process, and a written plan in which the candidate is asked to outline the next steps for their personal and professional development in the core competency area.  Any requests for accommodations for special needs may be made in writing to the credentialing body.
  5. Evaluation of applications. Once submitted, your materials will be assessed and evaluated by a peer review board made up of individuals chosen for their extensive expertise and competency in the micro-credential area. Using established rubrics and evaluation tools, the reviewers will provide their recommendation as to whether or not you have demonstrated sufficient competency to earn the micro-credential. The review of applications submitted within any enrollment period begins at the end of that enrollment period. Decisions are typically rendered within 60 to 75 days.
  6. Communicating the decision. If your application is successful, you will receive a corresponding digital badge (via Acclaim) to be used on your LinkedIn profile, CV, or professional website. This way, you can publicly display certification of your competency in the core competency area. If your application is unsuccessful, it will either be rejected or you will be given the option to revise and resubmit your materials. In either case, comprehensive feedback on areas of competency needing further development will be provided, as will suggestions for strategies to improve your competency.
  7. Seeking Full Certification as a Campus Compact CEP. To apply for full certification, a candidate must earn micro-credentials in the three (3) core competency areas (Community Engagement Fundamentals, Community Partnerships, and Equity & Inclusion) as well as earn three (3) additional micro-credentials in areas of their choice (i.e., three of among the remaining twelve [12] elective micro-credentials). Once a candidate has fulfilled this requirement, they may submit a personal statement that will qualify them to be considered for full certification. Note: Micro-credential to be applied toward full certification must be earned or renewed within the previous three years period.

Support and Preparation Opportunities for Applicants

  1. Micro-Credential “Knowledge Hubs”

For each available micro-credential, Campus Compact has created a specific knowledge hub that provides access to a variety of resources, including a vetted list of suggested readings and other valuable online resources and weblinks. Links to knowledge hubs can be found on individual micro-credential webpages and are updated on an ongoing basis. CEPs may suggest additional key readings and resources to include in any of the knowledge hubs by contacting Clayton Hurd (churd@compact.org).

  1. Communities of Practice (CoPs)

Current opportunities to participate in Communities of Practice (CoPs) aligned with the Credentialing Program can be found here.

Campus Compact encourages and supports the creation of Communities of Practice (CoPs) across our national network, as well as at member institutions, to support CEPs who may wish to participate in the credentialing program. These experiences are offered free of charge to participants. While participation in a CoP is not required to apply for micro-credentials, Campus Compact believes such experiences can play an important role in helping CEPs prepare for and earn micro-credentials by:

  1. Providing participants with the space to share, reflect on, and build their knowledge around key competencies they are expected to demonstrate to earn certification, and
  2. Providing a valued “cohort” experience for collegial support as participants reflect on their professional practice and prepare to submit required materials as part of the application process.

As the certifier of the Credentialing Program, Campus Compact shares a responsibility and mutual interest with network partners to ensure that preparatory experiences are well-aligned with expectations surrounding the review of applications and granting of the micro-credentials. For this reason, Campus Compact seeks to review and approve all CoP opportunities offered in association with the program in order to safeguard alignment and maximize the benefits to participating CEPs looking to position themselves to earn certification.

Campus Compact supports and encourages CoPs that are democratic and allow for the active, ongoing, and inclusive participation of all community members. In other words, they should not be designed simply as a set of didactic knowledge transfer workshops or webinars.  The ideal CoP embraces and embodies the following equity-based principles: that (a) everyone has knowledge to share, (b) everyone has learning to do, and (c) participants bring many identities and ways of knowing and that such diverse expressions should be encouraged and incorporated into CoP activities. For a useful and relevant model of CoP facilitation, please see Minnesota Campus Compact’s CoP facilitation guide here.

For more information, and to receive an outline of best practices for developing a CoP for the credentialing program, please contact Clayton Hurd, Campus Compact’s director of professional development at churd@compact.org.

  1. Approved Training Opportunities

Current training opportunities aligned with the Credentialing Program can be found here.

An “approved training opportunity” for the CEP Credentialing Program is distinct from a CoP offering. It is, in most cases, a specific learning program (e.g., course, seminar series, workshop, etc.), offered by a third party provider, designed to help individuals improve or enhance their professional knowledge, skills, and effectiveness. Like CoPs, these training are not required to apply for or earn micro-credentials, but they may be useful to individuals seeking to enhance their knowledge, skills, and experience in specific competency areas. Because most trainings are designed and offered by independent, third party providers–and not through the Campus Compact entity–the format, cost, and length of such opportunities may vary considerably.  Training opportunities that are publicized on our website are reviewed and approved after an assessment of the providers and their program content. This helps ensure the quality of the training experience as well as aids in the identification of key competencies that are addressed through the training.

  1. What distinguishes a CoP from an Approved Training Opportunity?

In the context of the CEP Credentialing Program, approved training opportunities are specific learning programs (e.g., courses, seminar series, workshops, etc.), offered by a third party provider, designed to help individuals improve or enhance their professional knowledge, skills, and effectiveness. Trainings are generally based on guided instruction, grounded in a clear curriculum, and deliberately designed to achieve specific learning goals. Approved trainings are those which Campus Compact believes will help CEPs advance their understanding or improve their practice in one or more micro-credential areas.

Campus Compact defines a community of practice (CoP) as a learning community, or collegial network constituted by “a group of people who share interest in an area of inquiry and engage in collective learning about that issue as it relates to their work or practice. Through discussions, joint activities, and relationship building, the community of practice develops a shared and individual repertoire of resources, skills, and knowledge to use in their practice.” (MN Campus Compact). By this definition, CoPs are not focused on content delivery but rather fundamentally designed to provide collegial support for those pursuing micro-credentials. Unlike a training opportunity, a CoP is by its nature much less didactic, instructional, and content driven;  learning goals are identified in process and strived for through a collective process.  When approving a specific CoP for the credentialing program, Campus Compact looks to assure that its design is democratic and that it embraces and embodies the following equity-based principles: that (a) everyone has knowledge to share, (b) everyone has learning to do, and (c) participants bring many identities and ways of knowing and that such diverse expressions should be encouraged and incorporated into CoP activities.

Recertification Requirements

Campus Compact encourages and supports the ongoing educational and professional development of our certification holders so they can continue to be prepared to recognize opportunities and confront challenges in the complex and evolving field of higher education community engagement.

For this reason, Campus Compact requires that individuals who earn a micro-credential(s) or full certification through the CEP credentialing program actively maintain their certification(s) through participation in continuing requirements and the renewal of their certification(s) every 3 years.

The purpose of continuing (re)certification requirements is to:

  • Enhance continuous learning and development among certification holders
  • Provide direction in professional development to ensure relevancy and continued competence of certified practitioners
  • Encourage and recognize individualized learning opportunities for CEPs to update existing knowledge and skills or to attain additional knowledge and skills.
  • Offer a mechanism for attaining and recording professional development experiences
  • Sustain the broad recognition and value of CEP certifications

Certification can be maintained by participating in professional development and learning activities that allows certification holders to earn Professional Development Units (PDUs) that fulfill the continuing certification requirements and ultimately help CEPs grow and develop as practitioners. Because each individual has unique professional needs and desires, our continuing certification requirements are designed to be flexible so that they can be adapted to those needs and allow individuals to customize their activities and developmental path. For example, relevant qualifying activities may include not only formal trainings but also mentoring activities, program sustaining activities, service to the field, peer review for the credentialing program, and earning additional micro-credentials. More information on how to earn and track PDUs for continuing certification will be forthcoming in 2020.

Managing Impartiality in the Credentialing Process

In the review of applications:

All individuals approved to review and evaluate micro-credential applications are required to complete conflict of interest agreement forms (see appendix) designed to identify potential sources of conflict and ensure impartiality in the review and evaluation process. In addition, reviewers as well as advisory board members are required to sign confidentiality agreements.

In selection of training providers:

Professional development training providers who wish to be approved to provide preparatory training for one or more of the micro-credentials must apply to Campus Compact for approval. Decisions to approve trainings will be made by Campus Compact staff based on the quality of the training content, the qualifications and skill of the facilitator(s), and the extent to which the content directly relates to the core competencies of the micro-credential to which it applies. Note: Participation in trainings is not required for individuals wishing to earn micro-credentials but may be useful as a means of enhancing knowledge, skills, and experience in specific competency areas.

Applicant Confidentiality and Security

When an applicant begins a micro-credential application, their submitted materials and personally-identifying information will be kept within a secure online application system (Survey Monkey Apply) accessible only to approved reviewers and select staff at Campus Compact who actively monitor and oversee the program. Once a decision has been rendered on an application, and the applicant has been notified, their submitted application materials will be archived in a secure electronic folder accessible only to select staff at the Compact, for a period of five (5) years .

Campus Compact shall ensure that information obtained during the certification process, or from sources other than the applicant, candidate, or certified person, is not disclosed to an unauthorized party without the written consent of the individual (applicant, candidate, or certified person), except where the law requires such information be disclosed. Furthermore, specific communications with applicants or credential persons regarding certification decisions will be held confidential and not shared with other individuals or entities outside the certification body without the written consent of the applicant or credentialed person.

The names of individuals who successfully earn a micro-credential will be publicly disclosed. However, the names of those who apply, but fail to earn a micro-credential, or are invited to revise and resubmit their application, will remain confidential and will not be released to the public or shared with any external entities without the written consent of the individual.

Once an individual successfully earns a micro-credential, Campus Compact will create and maintain a brief professional profile that contains data relevant to that individual’s experience, role, identified competency-based strengths, and areas that the individual has identified for further growth in their own professional development. This profile, and data within it, will not be shared publicly but will be used by Campus Compact to help identify opportunities to which the credentialed individual may be directed to enhance or further their professional development (e.g., relevant trainings, potential mentor/mentee relationships, publishing or dissemination opportunities, potential collaborative projects with other CEPs, etc.).

Request for consent to use application data for research purposes: In order to better understand the process and impact of certification activities on community engagement professionals, Campus would like to make some of responses in individual application available for research purposes, both for Campus Compact and other higher education researchers. Only data from individuals who actively agree to share their applications will be made available for research purposes. In such cases of active consent,  application materials will undergo a process of anonymization, meaning that applicant’s names, their institution name(s), and other personal identifying information will be removed. Campus Compact will use this data for their own research and program evaluation purposes and will create a process through which the data can be shared with other researchers who agree and are bound to strict human subjects requirements regarding confidentiality, anonymity, and beneficence.

Complaints & Appeals Policies and Procedures

Appeals:

Appeals of testing decisions may be made by submitting a Notice of Appeal, in writing, to Campus Compact at credential@compact.org within twenty (20) days of the receipt of the adverse decision. The Notice should include a description of the grounds for appeal, any new or additional information to be considered, and a mailing address and email address where Appellant can receive communication regarding the appeal. Failure to file a Notice of Appeal within the twenty (20) day time period will result in the dismissal of the appeal. Campus Compact will appoint three disinterested individuals serving on either the Operations of Content advisory board to review and consider the appeal.  At any time after receiving the Notice of Appeal and before deciding the appeal, the Appeals Committee may, at its discretion, request that appellant provide additional information or request information or an opinion from an appropriate content specialist regarding any aspect of the appeal. The Appeals Committee will conduct and complete the appeal within ninety (90) days after receipt of the Notice of Appeal. The Appeals Committee, in its discretion, may extend the time for completing the appeal. The Appeals Committee may consult legal counsel. Ultimately, the Appeals Committee will either affirm or overrule the decision from which appellant appeals. The written decision of the Appeals Committee, including a statement of the reasons for its decision, will be reported to Appellant and Campus Compact. The decision of the Appeals Committee is final and binding upon Appellant, Campus Compact, and all other persons.

Complaints:

Complaints about any aspect of the micro-credential application process may be made, in writing, and sent to Campus Compact via email (credential@compact.org) or

via postal mail to 89 South Street, Suite 103, Boston, MA, 02111. Complaints must be reported within 30 days of the event/incident cited, and copies of any documents that support the Complaint should be attached. An initial response to the complaint will be made within three (3) working days. Complaints must relate directly to the general operation of the CEP credentialing program. Such complaints may include such matters as dissatisfaction with certification processes, content, or administration; or claims of non-impartiality, discriminatory conditions, and violations of confidentiality. Campus Compact will review all certification-related complaints and conduct any necessary validation in a constructive, impartial and timely manner. A record of the complaint, including any subsequent action(s) taken, and the decision made will be maintained by Campus Compact, and the Sender of each will receive a written or verbal response regarding any intended action of Campus Compact in regard to the Complaint.  All information pertaining to the Complaint will remain confidential.

Denial or Revocation of Certification Policy

 Campus Compact has an obligation to deny or revoke certification status for the following sets of reasons (to view the full policy, go to Appendix 2):

  1. Criminal matters (convictions, guilty pleas or deferred adjudications): An applicant who has been convicted of a serious crime will be presumptively ineligible of credentialing
  2. Submission of Inaccurate or False Application Information: An applicant who submits inaccurate or false information to Campus Compact in relation to their application will be presumptively ineligible for credentialing and their application will be rejected
  3. Misconduct and Harassment: An applicant or certificant who engages in any of the following conduct with Campus Compact staff or CEP Credentialing Program representatives will be subject to sanctions by Campus Compact, including credential revocation, application rejection, and/or credential conditions:
    1. Communicating with Campus Compact repeatedly by telephone, electronic means, or in person for the purpose of harassing, abusing, or threatening Compact staff or representatives of the CEP Credentialing Program;
    2. Using any language of a profane or vulgar nature in person, telephone, or electronic communication with Compact staff or representatives of the credentialing program.

APPENDICES

I. Reviewer Confidentiality and Conflict of Interest Agreement

  1. Confidentiality
    • I understand that micro-credential applications are made available to reviewers solely for the purpose of reviewing those applications against the published micro-credential evaluation criteria established for the CEP Credentialing Program.
    • I agree not to discuss the contents of the applications outside of the context of the online review system, during or after the review process, and to discuss the applications only with the other reviewers and Campus Compact staff members in the context of, and under the procedures for, application review. I agree to follow the written instructions provided by Campus Compact for the completion of review forms. I also agree to retain no copies of documents or parts of documents related to review.
    • I further agree not to contact the originators of applications being reviewed concerning any aspect of their contents. In addition, I agree not to use any information obtained as a result of my participation as a reviewer for personal or private gain.
  2. Conflict of Interest
    • I hereby certify that, to the best of my knowledge, I do not have a conflict of interest and that my particular circumstances are not likely to raise the appearance of a conflict of interest, impropriety, or the appearance of impairment of objectivity with respect to any application I am asked to review or comment on.
    • For purposes of this agreement, I understand that interest may include an employment or prospective employment relationship with an applicant; a mentor, consultant, or trainer/trainee relationship;  or any number of financial creditor/debitor relationships with an applicant. An appearance of impairment of impartiality could result from an organizational conflict where, because of other activities or relationships with other persons or entities, a person is unable or potentially unable to render impartial evaluation of a candidate or recommendations to Campus Compact. It could also result from non financial gain to the individual, such as benefit to reputation or prestige in a professional field.
    • I also recognize that I will be considered to have a financial or other interest, and therefore a conflict of interest, if I am asked to review or comment on an application from
      • my spouse, minor child, or general partner;
      • an individual from an organization in which I serve as an officer, director, trustee, general partner, or employee;
      • Any person with whom I am negotiating or have an arrangement concerning employment or a past employer (within the last year);
      • Any person to whom I have provided professional development training, consultation, or direct mentorship as a community-engagement professional (within the last two years)
    • I recognize that my status as a reviewer for the credentialing program is a continuing representation.  I acknowledge that it is in effect at all times until I have completed all of the work expected of me in my role as reviewer.
    • If I discover that I might have a conflict of interest, might present a conflict of interest, or might have an appearance of impairment of objectivity with any application within the competition, I will immediately inform the appropriate Campus Compact official and refrain from further work as a reviewer until authorized to continue.
    • I also understand that my views as a peer reviewer for the CEP Credentialing Program will be protected from disclosure to the extent permitted by law.

II. Policy for Presumptive or Discretionary Denial or Revocation of Certification

Campus Compact has an obligation to deny or revoke certification status in a manner consistent with its ethics policy:

Criminal matters (convictions, guilty pleas or deferred adjudications):

An applicant who has been convicted of a serious crime will be presumptively ineligible of credentialing, and if having already received a credential, will have that certification revoked.  Specifically, crimes involving the following types of criminal matters will result in ineligibility or revoking of credentialed status.

  1. Crimes involving death, physical harm, or threat of physical harm to another person (e.g. , murder, domestic violence, assault, communicating threats)
  2. Sex crimes
  3. Crimes involving the abuse of children, the elderly, or individuals of diminished mental or physical capacity
  4. Crimes involving intimidation, involuntary enslavement, or restrain (e.g., hate crimes, terrorist threats, kidnappings, human trafficking)
  5. Crimes against the property of others, or involving the deception of others (e.g., theft, arson, forgery, fraud)
  6. Crimes involving the manufacture or distribution of controlled, dangerous substances
  7. Crimes involving the possession of a schedule I or II controlled substance (heroin, cocaine, oxycodone)
  8. Multiple offenses related to operating a motor vehicle when ability was impaired (e.g., DUI, DWI, OVI)

In order to request any exemption from these eligibility denial criteria, an applicant or revoked credential holder must submit written documentation supporting the request that demonstrates significant and extraordinary circumstances supporting credentialing; that a period of ten (10) years has elapsed since the completion of all co-ordered requirements; and that significant rehabilitative actions have been taken.

  1. An applicant or certificant who has been involved in the following matters may be deemed ineligible for Campus Compact credentialing:
  2. The applicant or certificant has been convicted to pled guilty to a crime, or received deferred adjudication, concerning a criminal charge not identified in Section A above;
  3. The applicant or certificant has been, or is currently, named as a defendant in a legal action related to their occupational activity;
  4. The applicant or certificant has been terminated or discharged from employment for conduct reasons;
  5. The applicant or certificant has been terminated by, or has been subject of academic discipline by, a graduate degree program for conduct reasons

The following criteria will be considered in determining whether an applicant or certificant involved in such a matter is eligible for (continuing) CEP credentialing.

  1. The seriousness of the disclosed matter.
  2. The relationship of the disclosed matter to applicant or certificant’s conduct, occupational activities, or ethical responsibilities as a community engagement professional.
  3. The amount of time that has passed since the matter occurred.
  4. The completion of any court, government entity, employer, organizational, or educational conditions or requirements
  5. Whether credentialing of the individual would negatively affect the public’s trust of Campus Compact and the identified credential.

All applicable criteria will be considered when reviewing an applicant or certificant’s eligibility for (continued) credentialing under this policy section

Submission of Inaccurate or False Application Information

An applicant who submits inaccurate or false information to Campus Compact in relation to their application will be presumptively ineligible for credentialing and their application will be rejected. The applicant will remain ineligible for credentialing for a minimum of five (5) years following such an application denial.

Once the credentialing ineligibility period has ended, an applicant may submit a request to reapply for Campus Compact credentialing. Based on the Compact’s review of the request, the applicant may be required to submit additional information or documentation related to the Compact’s consideration of the re-application request. Such information will be reviewed consistent with the Compact’s policies and procedures.

Certificant Conduct Matters

An applicant or certificant who engages in any of the following conduct with Campus Compact staff or CEP Credentialing Program representatives will be subject to sanctions by Campus Compact, including credential revocation, application rejection, and/or credential conditions;

  • Communicating with Campus Compact repeatedly by telephone, electronic means, or in person for the purpose of harassing, abusing, or threatening Compact staff or representatives of the CEP Credentialing Program
  • Using any language of a profane or vulgar nature in person, telephone, or electronic communication with Compact staff or representatives of the credentialing program.
Eligibility and Conduct Decisions

All decisions made pursuant to this policy will be communicated to the applicant or certificant in writing. Campus Compact reserves the right to publish or release decisions made under this policy to appropriate individuals, agencies, or organizations, as determined by Campus Compact.

Credential application fees will not be refunded for applications that are rejected by Campus Compact pursuant to this policy.

III. Request for Permission to Use Application Responses for Research Purposes

In order to better understand the process and impact of certification activities for community engagement professionals, we would like to make the responses in your application available for research purposes, for both Campus Compact and other higher education researchers. All application materials to be made available for research purposes will undergo a process of anonymization, meaning that applicant names, institution names, and other personal identifying information will be removed. Only applications from individuals that agree to the use of their application data will be made available for research purposes.

Please actively respond to A or B [yes/no] below:

  • I consent to having the information provided in the application for the purposes of research. In providing this consent, I understand that my name and the name of my institution will not be disclosed. (Yes/No)